Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Environmental Studies (MES)

Department

Geography & Environmental Studies

Faculty/School

Faculty of Science

First Advisor

Dr. Miguel Sioui

Advisor Role

Master's Supervisor

Abstract

Across the globe climate change has become an issue of growing concern for both Indigenous and non – Indigenous peoples alike. In Northern Canada this narrative is no different. For Indigenous groups such as the Jean Marie River First Nation (JMRFN) anthropogenic climate change is not only a reality but is visible through their daily interactions with the environment around them. Additional insight pertaining to these climatic changes and their impacts can be found through analyzing the traditional knowledge systems of the JMRFN and how these before mentioned interactions have changed over time. This two-year participatory research project has investigated these observed changes to the environment, there impacts on traditional cultural activities and the overall health of the JMRFN community. The analysis of these climatic changes have been done in hopes of better understanding how local Dene knowledges, values and culture can be applied to create an effective climate change adaptation strategy for JMRFN. Additionally, this research hopes to demonstrate why current non – Indigenous, top-down approaches to environmental management and climate change adaptation planning can be ineffective and culturally irrelevant for Indigenous peoples.

Convocation Year

2023

Convocation Season

Spring

Available for download on Sunday, July 23, 2023

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