Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Program Name/Specialization

Community Psychology

Faculty/School

Faculty of Science

First Advisor

Robb Travers

Advisor Role

Supervisor

Abstract

LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, plus) people are at a disadvantage compared to their heterosexual and cisgender (non-transgender) counterparts. LGBTQ+ people are likely to be discriminated against based on their gender or sexual identities. Drawing on data from the OutLook Study in Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada, this paper examines discrimination and social support among high school and post-secondary students, and how they are related to self-esteem. Using t-tests, we found that transgender students in high school reported significantly higher levels of direct transphobia and of victimization compared to transgender post-secondary students. Using multiple linear regressions, we found indirect homophobia and indirect transphobia had a significant adverse relationship to self-esteem. Further, social support from friends was related to higher self-esteem for cisgender LGBQ students, but not for transgender students. These findings have the potential to inform school-based policies and mental health interventions in support of improved wellbeing for LGBTQ+ students.

Convocation Year

2019

Convocation Season

Fall

Available for download on Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Share

COinS