Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Program Name/Specialization

Community Psychology

Faculty/School

Faculty of Arts

First Advisor

Dr. Robb Travers

Advisor Role

Supervisor

Abstract

This paper draws upon pilot-test data from an intersectional approach to a sexual violence prevention program on university campuses. While many programs have been created to address the sexual violence epidemic, many focus heavily on white, heterosexual, and cisgender scenarios. This research utilizes the Bringing in the Bystander® workshop, a community-based prevention initiative focused on preventing sexual violence through inspiring students to intervene in pro-social ways. In this analysis, the program maintained the same pedagogical structure, but contained a wider variety of narratives designed to include stories and scenarios about contexts relevant to the experiences of LGBTQ+ and racialized students. A pilot test was conducted using a pre-and post-test design. The researchers tested for: knowledge about sexual violence, (including an intersectional understanding of the issue), efficacy for intervening, and attitudes such as empathy and rape myth acceptance. Changes were present from pre- to post- workshop for readiness to change, empathy for survivors, and perceptions of intervention capabilities for intersectional bystander scenarios. Results suggest that diversifying content leads to desirable outcomes for students.

Convocation Year

2019

Convocation Season

Spring

Available for download on Saturday, December 14, 2019

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