Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Theology (MTh)

Department

Theology

Faculty/School

Seminary

First Advisor

Peter VanKatwyk

Advisor Role

Thesis Supervisor

Abstract

This study explores the dynamics of engaging the male batterer in the assessment interview. A model of interviewing is employed which considers both the interpersonal processes as well as the extent and relevance of the information which is gathered. Engagement is understood to have occurred when the client is committed to the process of therapy. The study focuses on the processes by which the battering client might be engaged in therapy. Consideration is also given to identifying factors which might prevent engagement. Theories of battering and engagement are explored in relationship to the work of Alan Jenkins. The extent and relevance of disclosure are discussed both in terms of the therapeutic interview and the use of the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis. A research study is constructed to explore male batterers' perceptions of themselves as revealed in their responses to the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis. Findings are discussed in light of known characteristics of batterers. A theological model for engaging batterers is developed based on the interviewing model and the Biblical words paraklesis and exhomologesis.

Convocation Year

1995

Convocation Season

Fall

Included in

Social Work Commons

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