Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Kinesiology (MKin)

Department

Kinesiology

Faculty/School

Faculty of Science

First Advisor

Dr. Paula Fletcher

Advisor Role

Supervisor

Abstract

Abstract

Objective

As the senior population in Canada rises, more middle aged residents of Canada will find themselves taking on a caregiving role, often times for a parent with dementia. This research examines the lived experiences of daughters/daughters-in-law providing primary informal care to their mothers/mothers-in-law with dementia in order to understand the motivations, effects, and transitions within caregiving relationships.

Methods

Phenomenology was the theoretical orientation used to guide this research and captured individuals’ lived experiences. Background questionnaires were administered initially, followed by one-on-one semi-structured interviews which were transcribed verbatim upon completion for data analysis. Field notes, member checks, and triangulation were used to further enhance the credibility of the study.

Results

From the analysis, four themes emerged: (1) “Master of none.”: The many roles of informal caregivers; (2) The face of dementia; (3) “What a life!?”; and (4)“Every so often you see a little bit of light.”: The silver linings. All of the women expressed experiencing a multitude of both positive and negative effects as a result of their caregiving experiences.

Conclusions

Informal caregivers play an integral role in the Canadian health care system. This study provides a glimpse into the hectic lives of these informal female filial dementia caregivers. Their stories can provide strength and hope for individuals who have provided care for family members with dementia in the past, in the present, or will do so in the future.

Convocation Year

2016

Convocation Season

Fall

Available for download on Thursday, August 30, 2018

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