Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

Program Name/Specialization

Community Psychology

Faculty/School

Faculty of Arts

First Advisor

Dr. Colleen Loomis

Advisor Role

Thesis Supervisor

Second Advisor

Dr. Geoff Nelson

Advisor Role

Internal Committee Member

Third Advisor

Dr. Julian Hasford

Advisor Role

Internal Committee Member

Abstract

Resident participation is a vital factor and key prerequisite to the planning, development and implementation of community-driven projects. Early implementation evaluations, especially during the planning stages of project development, are critical to ensuring effective resident participation. Understanding the nature of resident participation, including the activities involved, facilitators, barriers, and outcomes of engagement, is essential for laying the foundation for program success and sustainability. This study was an implementation evaluation of a small community-based initiated project that examined resident participation, varying by degrees of involvement throughout the early stages of implementation. The sample (N = 11) consisted of three service-providers, two highly-engaged residents, four less-engaged residents and two project staff. The qualitative data analysis found that during the exploration stage, highly-engaged residents and service-providers participated in similar activities. However, as the implementation process progressed into the following installation stage, highly-engaged residents expressed desires to reduce involvement and responsibilities, while project staff, service-providers and those less involved wished to remain as involved or increase participation. Additionally, findings revealed that project challenges were perceived differently by residents, regardless of level of involvement, than by service-providers and project staff. The findings of this study produced recommendations for increasing facilitators and reducing barriers to resident participation during the early stages of an implementation process of a community-based project.

Convocation Year

2016

Convocation Season

Spring

Available for download on Thursday, May 03, 2018

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