Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Social Work (MSW)

Department

Social Work

Faculty/School

Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work

First Contributor

Sarah Maiter

Contributor Role

Thesis Supervisor

Abstract

While abused women shelters using feminist interventions make up the majority of services being provided to all abused women, very little research has focused on the efficacy of using feminist ideology with abused minority women. As an initial step in evaluating the aforementioned area, this study identified the major needs and concerns of abused Caribbean-Canadian women staying in feminist abused women shelters. It also identified the benefits and barriers of using a feminist ideology with these women, as expressed by support staff who have worked with Caribbean-Canadian women. Information was gathered in interviews with 6 female staff who work in shelters in Southern Ontario, Canada. A thematic analysis indicated that the research participants felt that there are many barriers with regards to using a feminist ideology with Caribbean-Canadian women. Some include: a lack of support for religion, lack of cultural understanding, and apprehension with feminism. In addition, the participants noted the frequent experiences of racism and discrimination that Caribbean women experience from the shelter organization, the residents and in Canadian society. Also, the participants noted various directions for enhanced services for abused Caribbean-Canadian women. The implications of the study are discussed in relation to the need for services that more accurately integrate the unique ideas, perspectives and needs of Caribbean-Canadian women, as well as services, that work from a truly anti-oppressive framework.

Convocation Year

2005

Convocation Season

Spring