Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Social Work (MSW)

Department

Social Work

Faculty/School

Lyle S. Hallman Faculty of Social Work

First Contributor

Nick Coady

Contributor Role

Thesis Supervisor

Abstract

Violence against women by their male partners is a prevalent problem in North America; therefore, it is important to provide treatment for men who abuse. Although group treatment has been found to be effective in reducing men's abusive behaviour, the high attrition rates common in such groups limit the number of men who benefit from treatment. This present study examined sociodemographic, experiential, and program-related variables to determine the predictors of level of attendance in a group treatment program for men who abuse. Data were collected from 243 men who attended either a 16 week group or a 24 week group at a community program in Calgary, Alberta. The results indicated there were no significant differences in attendance between the 16 week and 24 week groups. Using the aggregated data, the study found that higher attendance rates were associated with older age, higher levels of education, non-violent criminal histories, lower amounts of reported drug use, and longer intimate relationships. Moreover, a direct entry multiple regression revealed that education was a significant predictor of attendance. Identifying the risk factors for premature drop out will help service providers develop new ways to meet the needs of men who abuse so that group treatment can become more effective.

Convocation Year

2004

Convocation Season

Spring

Included in

Social Work Commons

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